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The Female Perspective: Ode To “Agent Carter”

Welcome! This is a weekly blog* by Author J.L. Metcalf where I discuss anything and everything that strikes my fancy. If you have ideas on what you think I should write about, please send me an email via my website!

For now, sit back, relax and enjoy the blog!

*All views expressed in “The Female Perspective” are those of J.L. Metcalf, not Great Stories, Inc


It’s been a few weeks now so I have been able to process my sadness at the fact that after only two (dynamite) seasons, Agent Carter was cancelled by ABC. I’m sure they have their reasons but to them I say, “You ABC people are a bunch of doodie-heads.” I know, I know, this is a family blog nd such strong language shouldn’t be used but I’m darn angry about the loss of Agent Carter so I just don’t care anymore!

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Joking aside, I am annoyed that ABC cancelled it. I wasn’t shocked, Haley Atwell had signed onto another show so it was looking as if Carter’s days were numbered, but I was sad. Agent Carter was really the first TV show to focus on a female character. Unheard of in the Marvel Cinematic (or TV) Universe. It was a story about a woman who battled tremendous grief at the loss of her love Captain America, along with massive waves of sexism as well as the pain of survivor guilt (not just because of the loss of the Captain, but also, as we find out in season two of the show, her brother’s death). Peggy Carter is the hero we ladies always wanted but never got. She didn’t have super powers, she was just wicked smart, incredibly brave and amazingly talented. She was the kind of “superhero” I want to be as an adult. When I was a kid I wanted powers like Wonder Woman or even Batman, I wanted gadgets and seemingly super human strength. With Peggy Carter, it was different. She was the kind of woman that most women aspire to be. Smart, sassy and respected.

“… [T]hat’s what I love about Peggy and why I’m not ready to let her go. She’s easy to relate to: Her spunk, sass, determination, brawler fighting style—all of it is special and everyday at the same time. Peggy is utterly human and completely wonderful, and it’s a state I both aspire to and am inspired by.” – AMY RATCLIFFE for The Nerdist

The fact is, when we first meet Peggy Carter in Captain America: The First Avenger we don’t really see her at first. We see a pretty British woman who seems smart and uninterested in Steve Rogers. We’re so focused on the Captain that we don’t see Carter right away. Then, when the poop hits the fan, we see a woman brave enough to stand in the street shooting at a car that is driving right at her. Then she shoots at Rogers’ shield in a fit of anger. It was both a funny moment and also one that is extremely telling of her character. In a world full of men, Carter wants to be seen as tough and above “typical” female emotions, but she likes Steve and doesn’t like seeing him kissing another woman. It’s a wonderfully human response, but in the best, most comedic way.

It’s a moment that makes her memorable. It’s that moment that I wanted to know more about Agent Carter.

Agent Peggy Carter has become a beacon of feminism for the Marvel Universe.
Agent Peggy Carter has become a beacon of feminism for the Marvel Universe.

Both seasons of Agent Carter are excellent, but season two of Agent Carter was hands-down some of the best writing I’ve ever seen on TV. It was a complicated tale of two women going up against each other, trying to find their power in a male-dominated world. One, Peggy Carter, chooses to do it by fighting against the darkness. The other, Whitney Frost, chooses to do it by becoming the darkness.

Peggy and Jarvis, what a wonderfully odd couple.
Peggy and Jarvis, what a wonderfully odd couple.

In the midst of their battle, people get hurt (Mrs. Jarvis almost died for goodness sake!) and Peggy and Jarvis are constantly at odds with one another as he fears that Peggy will do whatever it takes to take down the bad guys, without concern for her life or others, and Peggy desperately wants to keep Jarvis safe, even if it doesn’t always look like that.

Now that I’ve mentioned him, let’s talk about Jarvis a bit, he’s blundering and wonderful comic relief but the chemistry between him and Peggy is electric and wonderful to watch (as is her interactions between her and Stark). I could watch them put together a stereo and be highly entertained. It’s a marvelous dynamic because even though Jarvis helps Peggy in many ways, she ultimately saves him time and time again. Jarvis keeps her grounded in her humanity, he gives her a reason to survive the missions. That push and pull is part of what makes Peggy so compelling to watch. Like so many of her male counterparts, Peggy wants to do what is right and save the world, but at what cost to her life and her humanity? Peggy deserves a third (and fourth, and fifth!) season to work this stuff out. Not to mention, don’t we want to watch her found S.H.I.E.L.D? I know I do!

Bring Peggy BACK!
Bring Peggy BACK!

I don’t usually get too upset over the cancellation of TV shows, the exceptions being Firefly and Constantine, but now I have to sadly add Agent Carter to that list. It’s a big loss for women and for TV viewers to lose such a smartly written, engaging show. There’s been a lot of talk lately of Netflix picking up the show as well as Atwell herself saying she would do “whatever it takes” to bring Agent Carter back to the small screen, fingers crossed people!

Here’s hoping Netflix picks it up!

Did you enjoy Agent Carter? How do you feel about the shows cancellation? Should Netflix bring it back? Sound off in the comments!

 

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The Female Perspective: Ladies Are Taking Care of Business…

Welcome! This is a weekly blog* by Author J.L. Metcalf where I discuss anything and everything that strikes my fancy. If you have ideas on what you think I should write about, please send me an email via my website!

For now, sit back, relax and enjoy the blog!

*All views expressed in “The Female Perspective” are those of J.L. Metcalf, not Great Stories, Inc.


I thought about writing about Daredevil season 2 and how amazing the women are in that show but then I started thinking in a slightly broader sense. As I was binge watching season 2 with my man I realized that in the Marvel film and TV universe, they are writing exceptional women. Women who fight, who love and who do not apologize for being tough and brave, but who are also feminine and have their weak moments as well.

It’s bloody brilliant.

Elektra stands on her own (and apart) from her male counterparts in "Daredevil" season 2.
Elektra stands on her own (and apart) from her male counterparts in “Daredevil” season 2.

I am obviously a huge fan of the Marvel Universe that’s being created but I didn’t stop to really think of why, beyond the flash and fun of course, and now I realize it’s because in pretty much ever movie or TV show I’ve watched the women are bad ass, in the most wonderful way. This is feminism at work, this is equality at work and it’s wonderful to see. Today young girls have the option of so many female role models from Black Widow to Supergirl to Agent May on Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D and so many more that’s actually quite staggering. Even on a show like Daredevil the character of Elektra had the potential to be overshadowed by the “big boys” like Punisher and Daredevil himself, but she didn’t, she had her own storyline, her own struggles, her own power. Karen Page, a normal human by all accounts, finds her way in the world, finds her purpose and doesn’t ever become meek or fragile, even when kidnapped and fearful of her life, she manages to use her head and even though she doesn’t technically save the day, she manages to keep herself alive and guess what? She doesn’t fall apart in a sobbing pile in a man’s arms after. She picks herself up and keeps going. Elektra and Karen were essential to this season of Daredevil and that makes my feminist heart flutter with joy.

To me that’s how women should be written for TV or film. As women who can fight for their life when they need to, who can keep their heads in terrifying situations and who can rebound after those situations and keep going, keep fighting. They don’t run to the nearest man for love and/or sex and/or comforting, they comfort themselves and get going. They take care of business.

Frankly, that’s how the women I know in real life act. Of course, none of them have been kidnapped by madmen (thank God), but we have all had stressful situations in our life. We crumble, we fight, we cry, we get back up. That’s how you do it and it’s about damn time that TV and film catch onto that.

It’s been a gradual shift and Marvel is not the only one doing it by any means. If we look at Rey from Star Wars: The Force Awakens or Katniss from The Hunger Games (not a fave of mine but I know a strong lady when I see one) or one of my favorites, Black Widow from The Avengers and Captain America. What I love about Black Widow is that she is evolving, we first see her in Iron Man 2 and she is a sexy lady who turns out can fight circles around the men. Then we start to see her in other Marvel films and she starts to become a person, not just a fighter and a solider, but a person. In Age of Ultron she speaks about feeling like a monster for what she has done, for what has been done to her and when faced with the choice of fighting or running away with Bruce, she chooses to fight, because that’s what has to be done. She sacrifices her happiness for the greater good and hopefully you all know some women like that in your lives, I know I certainly do.

Black Widow doesn't apologize for who she is, it weighs heavily upon her, but she keeps on going, carrying that load.
Black Widow doesn’t apologize for who she is, it weighs heavily upon her, but she keeps on going, carrying that load.

The fact is, women are smart, sexy, tough and wonderful (as are men), and what makes me truly happy is to see that finally reflected in popular fiction on TV and in movies. I have high hopes for this weekends big release Batman v. Superman, not because of Batman or Superman, but because of Wonder Woman. FINALLY we get to see her in action and I for one, am extremely hopeful that WW takes after all the women before her and comes off as tough but feminine in the best ways possible.

What I am really digging is that while the costumes are tight fitting and all that, they aren’t slutty or offensive, they make sense for the character and (unlike what so often happens in comics) they are both sensible and sexy, a wonderful combination because when we see young girls cosplaying their favorites, we don’t have to sensor it because hey, it’s long pants and sleeves with a high neckline, fabulous! It makes me proud to be able to witness a time when characters like Agent Peggy Carter and Daisy from S.H.I.E.L.D move flawlessly from being powerful and brave, to being confused and/or uncertain and back again. These are flawed women, beautifully flawed women that aren’t taken advantage of. They stand toe-to-toe with the male characters and sometimes, they end up saving them.

"Don't worry fellas, I'll protect you." - Wonder Woman
“Don’t worry fellas, I’ll protect you.” – Wonder Woman

It’s a wonderful thing to witness, and with so much going on today that is stressful, sad or troubling, it’s truly heartening to be able to see women gaining so much ground, even if it is in a fictional sense. Here’s hoping that one day soon, it will start to really, truly happen in the “real” world.

How about YOU? What female character do you love that’s on TV or in film nowadays? Sound off in the comments and tell me why you love her!

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The Female Perspective: Oh Agent Carter, You Wiley Devil You

Welcome! This is a weekly blog* by Author J.L. Metcalf where I discuss anything and everything that strikes my fancy. If you have ideas on what you think I should write about, please send me an email via my website!

For now, sit back, relax and enjoy the blog!

*All views expressed in “The Female Perspective” are those of J.L. Metcalf, not Great Stories, Inc.


I’ve written about Agent Carter before and gosh dang it, the show is so good, I’m going to do it again, because it deserves more attention than it seems to be getting. If you haven’t watched the first season, go, now, do that and then come back and read this!

Onward and upward as they say…

My fave TV couple, Peggy Carter and Jarvis!
My fave TV couple, Peggy Carter and Jarvis!

In season one of Agent Carter we got to know SSR Agent Peggy Carter a bit better, we knew about her love for good ole Captain America and we know how that romance ended, but what about the woman behind SHIELD? The woman that shot Captain America multiple times to make sure his shield worked? What is her story? How did she fare after WWII was over and the “womenfolk” were sent back to the kitchens?

Well, I think it’s pretty safe to say that Agent Carter had a rough go of it after the war but if nothing else, she is tenacious. You cannot stop her and that, I absolutely adore. She makes me want to be just like her. Never give up on what’s right and above all, don’t give up on what you want.

It’s a perfect message for female viewers, young and old.

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I’ll admit right here that I haven’t checked the ratings on Agent Carter but I’ve begun hearing pesky rumors that she won’t be back for a season 3 and that really makes me angry. If the dang Kardashians (gag) can be on TV season after season, than Agent Carter, at the very least deserves a 3rd season.

Why is one of the best shows on TV not getting the attention it deserves?

In one of the recent episodes a character named Whitney Frost declares that she is trying to find a place of power for those that are treated as unequal (namely, women and African-Americans), it’s a poignant message in this time of both racial and feminist inequality.  Unfortunately, Frost is taking a bad path, she doesn’t just want equality, she wants power. ALL the power. She wants to rule. She wants to take over. Unfortunately, that’s not the way to do it. Luckily for the world, Agent Carter and her team is on the job and they are going to do everything they can to stop Frost from enacting what I am sure is a truly evil plan. I can’t wait for the season finale (I’ll be watching it tonight) to see what Frost tries next!

MARVEL'S AGENT CARTER - "Better Angels" - Peggy's search for the truth about Zero Matter puts her on a collision course with her superiors as Howard Stark barnstorms in, on "Marvel's Agent Carter," TUESDAY, JANUARY 26 (9:00-10:00 p.m. EST) on the ABC Television Network. (ABC/Eric McCandless) WYNN EVERETT
MARVEL’S AGENT CARTER – “Better Angels” – Peggy’s search for the truth about Zero Matter puts her on a collision course with her superiors as Howard Stark barnstorms in, on “Marvel’s Agent Carter”.

I was excited about Agent Carter when it came on for it’s “special run” last year and was even more thrilled when season two was announced. This season has actually been even better than season one because we have distanced quite a bit from Captain America and Peggy is standing on her own stylish two feet as she runs, jumps and quips with Jarvis (can I take a moment to say I adore Jarvis) on a weekly basis. It’s a smart show and each episode is full of meaningful moments and important statements that directly impact our own politically-charged world.  The last 2 weeks have aired back-to-back episodes that almost feel like little movies and it’s been a joy, it’s also been quite a bit to take in all at once (this is certainly a show I want on DVD to enjoy over and over again) and you can feel the intensity building with each episode, I have no doubt we are racing towards a fairly epic conclusion and I cannot wait to see where we go.

Season 2 of "Agent Carter" has been full of politically important moments, including an interracial romance.
Season 2 of “Agent Carter” has been full of politically important moments, including an interracial romance.

The show is well-written, well-acted and darn-it, it’s important. In a TV landscape that can be quite iffy when it comes to great female leads Agent Carter is chock full of women taking care of business and standing up for themselves. The idea that it might be cancelled and a show like Supergirl (that I started out loving and have since become fairly bored with due to it’s trite treatment of its female characters) or a show like … Well, at the moment I can’t think of another show with a strong female lead (wait, there’s my newfound love of The 100 which I will get into next week) so therein I make my point, we simply don’t have enough TV programs with really great, strong, interesting female leads that aren’t about romance but are about action, getting things done and making a difference. Everything about Agent Carter is refreshing and fun. I sure hope it comes back for a season 3.

What do YOU think? Do you watch Agent Carter? Tell me YOUR thoughts in the comments!

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The Female Perspective: Why I’m Disappointed in “Supergirl”

Welcome! This is a weekly blog* by Author J.L. Metcalf where I discuss anything and everything that strikes my fancy. If you have ideas on what you think I should write about, please send me an email via my website!

For now, sit back, relax and enjoy the blog!

*All views expressed in “The Female Perspective” are those of J.L. Metcalf, not Great Stories, Inc.


Oh Supergirl, I had such high hopes for you. I was so excited during the first episode when you seemed smart and capable. When you seemed unsure of your power and how to use it for good. When it seemed like you were going to be a good show.

Now, however many episodes in, I’m bored.

Here is why I’m disappointed in Supergirl.

  1. She’s trite. With all the power and responsibility now at her feet, she carries a torch for Jimmy Olsen and obsesses about what Cat needs. She also spends a lot of time convincing those around her that she is smart and capable and that they are super duper people with great personalities. Gag.
  2. Her friends are boring and needy and I find Jimmy Olson boring as heck.
  3. I feel that the feminist angle is being literally shoved down my throat rather than just placed gently in front of me (ala Agent Carter). We DO NOT need to be reminded multiple times in an episode that Supergirl is a woman. It’s built right into her title, SuperGIRL. Leaves nothing to the imagination. Stop telling us that she’s a woman and that women have to be strong and powerful. What I mean by stop telling is to start SHOWING us. Give us a Supergirl that IS strong instead of her talking about it all the dang time.
  4. The fact that they can’t have Superman on the show is lame and her sharing cute little IM’s with him is just stupid. They need to figure that out STAT.
  5. The writing stinks. It’s trite and it’s extraordinarily lazy. When you have someone with super hearing that doesn’t hear her best friend being kidnapped in the hallway outside your apartment, that’s an issue.

The fact is, Supergirl is a show that has a lot of potential. I still have hope that they’ll figure out who they are before Season 2 because right now Supergirl is in the midst of an identity crisis. It wants to be a show about a kick-ass heroine but it also wants to appeal to teenagers and young girls.

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Let me tell you something CBS, you can have a show about a woman that is both smart, fun AND appealing to young girls without making it suck for the adults who watch it. My boyfriend loves all the little nugget of Supergirl coolness that they add in for fans. We both detest the “love triangle” between Kara, Jimmy and her geeky friend who’s name I can’t even be bothered to remember. It’s boring. As a grown woman,  I find the fact that another grown woman (and SUPERGIRL no less) is clearly pining away for Jimmy. He has a woman, get over it Kara and do something with all your power, you know, save some people instead of eating pizza with your sister or getting food for Cat.

I know that Supergirl has to have human qualities, especially since she’s lived as a human most of her life but … Does she have to be so childish? So … bubble-headed? I long for the Supergirl created by Helen Slater, she was young and naive but she was also strong, smart and more than capable of saving her friends from the witchy Selena. I think Supergirl is having issues because it is on CBS and not the CW like it’s brother shows, Arrow and The Flash. Both shows are killing it on the CW. Both shows are about hero’s who are flawed, confused and longing for a normal life but also fighting bad guys and being smart. They have the formula down (but, to be fair, it took a season for Arrow to get really good), Supergirl needs some help and I hope she finds it before she gets the axe.

I need Supergirl to be...well, SUPER.
I need Supergirl to be…well, SUPER.

I also know that a show about a female heroine can be good. Agent Carter is the perfect example of that. Peggy Carter is smart, kind, strong and capable. All the things a woman should be who is used to taking care of herself. Supergirl seems like she’s never taken care of a houseplant, let alone herself, though we’re supposed to believe she’s lived on Earth most of her life, has an apartment and a job and yet, she’s still so … blah. I want more from my Supergirl and I’m willing to be patient because I’m a patient woman, but if Season 2 is anything like Season 1, this woman is going to start skipping Supergirl and go straight for Agent Carter.

What do you think of Supergirl? Is she “super” or is she boring? Sound off in the comments?

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The Female Perspective: Jessica Jones

Welcome! This is a weekly blog* by Author J.L. Metcalf where I discuss anything and everything that strikes my fancy. If you have ideas on what you think I should write about, please send me an email via my website!

For now, sit back, relax and enjoy the blog!

*All views expressed in “The Female Perspective” are those of J.L. Metcalf, not Great Stories, Inc.


Alright, it’s been a couple weeks since Jessica Jones was released on Netflix so hopefully this won’t be a spoiler blog post for those who haven’t watched it yet.  I try not to be a spoiler but if you haven’t seen it then maybe don’t read this yet! You can always save it for later, post-viewing.

"Jessica Jones" is a very different superhero show and I love it.
“Jessica Jones” is a very different superhero show and I love it.

That being said let’s talk about Jessica Jones and why it is so important to the television landscape. It’s not just because it’s centered around a female character (that, in and of itself is a miracle at a time when we have two other female-centered shows in Supergirl and Agent Carter), it’s about the fact that it’s not all lightness and humor. It’s about a woman who was kidnapped, raped and abused for years by a man and who came out the other side to try and live a normal life (well, within the confines of also being a superhero). As with all things, life has a different plan for Jessica and she quickly finds out that her abuser is alive and stalking her through other people.

It’s a brutal premise and it’s beautifully executed by the folks at Netflix. Jessica isn’t treated like a damaged, fragile creature. She’s treated as a human being who has been through absolute Hell and who just wants to move on. Jessica has flaws, lots of them. She’s snarky, has a bad drinking habit and she distances herself from other people because she fears what might happen to them because of her past pain. She’s messed up and I absolutely love her for it.

So I get understandably frustrated when I see people comparing Jessica Jones to Daredevil. These are not the same shows folks. These are VERY different shows. Just because they live in the same Marvelverse as one another does not mean they are the same thing. Where Daredevil was more carefree and action-oriented, Jessica Jones is a character study about living with abuse. Where Daredevil is the origin of a superhero in the making, Jessica Jones is about a woman who doesn’t want anyone to know about her abilities and even more than that, she doesn’t even really want to be a hero to anyone. She simply wants to do her job, drink her booze and get through each day.

Kilgrave makes my skin crawl.
Kilgrave makes my skin crawl.

On the other hand, I get it, of course you’re going to compare one superhero show to another. We do it all the time with the Avengers movies versus the Superman movies and things like that because they do exists in the same Marvelverse with one another but I am hard-pressed to say that one is better than the other simply because they are both so very different from one another. They share a common darkness but where Daredevil goes around saving people and beating up the bad guys, Jessica Jones turns her back and wants to run away from the man who abused her for so long. In fact, we aren’t even sure if she is going to go after him until, ultimately, she has no other choice.

Let’s talk about her abuser, her captor, Kilgrave. A name that gets some fun jokes near the end of the season but those jokes do not lesson the horrific nature of Kilgrave’s power. The man can literally make you do things you don’t want to do. Add to that that he is played by the fantastic David Tennant and you have a match made in villain heaven. When he’s on screen (and even when you only hear him obsessively saying Jessica Jones over and over again) he oozes creepy vibes. He makes your skin crawl and you want Jessica to beat him to a pulp so badly it hurts! This man cannot be trusted and he must be stopped but it’s also totally understandable as to why Jessica has such a hard time being near him. Wouldn’t you if this man kidnapped you and forced you to do horrible, demeaning things? Forced you to have sex against your will? He makes my skin crawl even as I type this. This is the kind of superpower that should never exist.

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Now, I’m a fan of the gritty superhero movie. I have loved all of Christopher Nolan’s Batman movies and am enjoying the world Zach Snyder has created in Superman, but I also enjoy the lighter flicks like the Joss Whedon-helmed Avengers movies. I can go either way as long as the show or movie is well written and directed and acted. Jessica Jones is all these things and more. It’s gritty and has dark humor, it’s got sex and violence and a lot of heart to it. What I love most about it is the fact that it’s not about someone trying to do right, it’s simply about a woman trying to survive her trauma and make some kind of a life for herself.

I sure hope that Jessica Jones gets a Season 2 and I look forward to all the other superhero shows helmed by female characters that will be coming our way and that exist in our world today. It may be baby steps, but we are making progress people. Now, if only we can get those Black Widow, Princess Leia, etc action figures things will really be smoking!

What did you think of Jessica Jones? Good, bad, ugly?

Tell me YOUR thoughts in the comments!

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The Female Perspective: Supergirl, Then and Now

Welcome! This is a Tri-weekly blog* by Author J.L. Metcalf where I discuss anything and everything that strikes my fancy. If you have ideas on what you think I should write about, please send me an email via my website!

For now, sit back, relax and enjoy the blog!

*All views expressed in “The Female Perspective” are those of J.L. Metcalf, not Great Stories, Inc.


I was originally going to write about the new “Mad Max: Fury Road” controversy of men being angry about the movie being “feminist propaganda” but instead, I want to talk a little bit more about Supergirl – both the 1984 movie and the upcoming TV series on CBS.

1984 Supergirl. Rock on Supergirl, ROCK. ON.
1984 Supergirl. Rock on Supergirl, ROCK. ON.

First, we’ll start with the 1984 movie. I am going to state right up front that I LOVE this movie. It was the very first superhero movie I ever watched (that I recall) and not only that, it starred a female hero. My budding little feminist heart was thrilled beyond measure to see a woman kicking butt and getting stuff done with grace, ease and amazing strength and without looking like a hooker. I watched this movie a lot as a girl and I recently re-watched it as “research” for this piece. Though, to be fair, I didn’t need to re-watch it since I pretty much have it memorized.

Faye Dunaway as Selena? She pretty much ate up the screen in her scenes.
Faye Dunaway as Selena? She pretty much ate up the screen in her scenes.

A lot of folks don’t like this movie for various reasons I simply don’t understand. Sure, it’s 80’s cheese in some degrees but it has an all-star cast, I mean, seriously, FAYE DUNAWAY as the villain Selena, how can you go wrong? Not to mention Peter O’Toole as Supergirl’s mentor and friend, Zalfar. It’s a pretty stellar cast if you ask me. Helen Slater nails the innocent power that is both Supergirl and Kara Zor-El from Argo City.

Kara, after an unfortunate accident that is equal parts Zalfar and her faults, finds herself on Earth. She has powers and can fly for cripes sake! She is also on a mission to find the Omega Hedron and save her city from certain death (by suffocation no less). She spends a few moments (during some really awesome wire work) flying around and getting used to her new strength and her new world before she gets back to work looking for the Omega.

What gets me most about this movie is the utter strength of the women in this film. Dunaway’s Selena is crazy as all good villains should be, but she is also powerful and confident in her power (with the exception of a few amusing fumbles), she doesn’t need a man and continuously tricks them to get what she wants. Slater’s Supergirl brings out the appropriate amount of gravitas and fun that Supergirl should have. Honestly, for me, it’s like watching a comic on-screen.

If you are a regular reader of my blog than you know that my favorite part of this movie is the ending sequences. When Supergirl has to escape the Phantom Zone with Zalfar, she loses her friend and has to go on alone. That moment is precious to me. It is Kara realizing her true power and strength. She has to keep moving and DARN-IT, that scene gives me chills every time I watch it.

To me, this is a perfect movie for young girls to see if they want to see a female superhero or even before they start watching the CBS show to get a feel for Kara Zor-El and the Supergirl universe. Not only is Supergirl not treated like a sex object, she is actually treated like an equal to the men around her (to be fair, the male characters are pretty much reduced to stumbling buffoons, funny but not my favorite part of the film). This is a feminist movie that isn’t trying to be a feminist movie. That’s what I love about it.

Oh Zalfar. "On Girl!"
Oh Zalfar. “On Girl!”

Sadly, it flopped in theaters and we never saw another Supergirl film. Lucky for us, the recent rise in the love of all things comics (Green Arrow, The Flash, The Avengers, etc) has brought Supergirl back to us. Later this year, CBS will launch their version of Supergirl for TV audiences. They recently released a 6 minute preview of the show and I have to admit, I am pretty psyched. Check it out if you haven’t seen it already.

https://youtu.be/Lm46-envrHo

It’s a long preview and it shows a lot of good stuff. It also gives us a lighter, more fun superhero show. it comes from the mind of the creators of The Arrow and The Flash which only makes me more excited. On Arrow the women are as strong as the men, they fight side by side with them. Not to mention, the action/fight sequences should prove to be beautifully choreographed. Besides all of that I have to say that I’m pleased with her costume, her attitude and oh, everything about it. It looks fun and kick-ass, a winning combination – if you ask me. I have the hope that it will be a proof to all those Execs out there that think a female-centric superhero show/movie can’t work, that lady hero’s are just as watchable as male hero’s. I mean seriously, look at Agent Carter! She was step one, let’s hope Supergirl will be step two to us finally seeing a female hero movie on the big screen.

Our new Supergirl. She looks very promising.
Our new Supergirl. She looks very promising.

I’ve read varying degrees of happiness and unhappiness about the trailer which is to be expected. I mean, you can’t please everyone, right? What irritates me is when people nit pick. For example, I saw one complaint that the guy playing Jimmy Olson isn’t wimpy or unattractive and is (gasp) being played by a black man and not a pale-faced ginger. Listen folks, it’s OKAY to change things up every once in a while if the story stays relatively true to the characters. I don’t care what color Olsen is as long as he’s a good actor. I’ve also seen complaints that they mention Superman too much. Sigh. Really? The 1984 movie talks about him a lot, they even go so far as to show a poster of him in Linda Lee’s dorm room. It’s allowed people, Superman IS her cousin and they share super powers! Seems to me that it would only be natural, as Kara finds her power, that she talks about her cousin who knows of what she speaks.

I personally am ready to check out this new Supergirl and I have high hopes for it, Lord knows I needed a win this week after the debacle that was the Jem and The Holograms trailer!

Time will tell and hopefully I won’t be writing another blog in a few months complaining about our new Supergirl.

So tell me, what do YOU think? Did you love the 1984 version of Supergirl? Did you love the comics? Are you excited for the new show? Why or why not? Sound off in the comments!

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The Female Perspective: Strong Women in Power Are Everywhere!

Welcome! This blog is written by author J.L. Metcalf and will chat about comics, movies, garden gnomes, ghosts or even books and daily life. It is a place where I offer my ladylike perspective on anything and everything my brain can think of. 


I’ve been noticing a trend on TV lately, there are quite a few strong women being portrayed in positions of power. It’s wonderfully enjoyable and completely refreshing to turn on the TV and see a woman leading the charge and showing that a woman in power can be sexy, brave, smart, funny and a total bad-ass.

Some of my favorite TV shows are stuff like Walking Dead, Scandal, How To Get Away with Murder, Empire, House of Cards and lots more. All of these shows have the same thing in common, strong female characters.

Cookie is a little bit crazy, a lot powerful and a wonderfully fun character to watch!
Cookie is a little bit crazy, a lot powerful and a wonderfully fun character to watch!

Shows like Empire and Scandal are particularly empowering because they not only have strong women being portrayed but they have women of color being portrayed in positions of power as well. I mean, Olivia Pope in Scandal is the woman everyone wants, literally. This season proved that beyond a shadow of a doubt. The fact is, these women are shown as being smart and sexy without shame or apology. The men listen to them and value their opinions. In a show like House of Cards, we see Claire Underwood, a woman who is often over-shadowed by her husband Frank but who is credited with getting him to where he is. Not to mention, she is his sounding board for almost every decision he makes. There’s is a partnership built on a lust for power and equality (I only speak of Seasons 1 and 2 here, no spoilers for the new season!). They balance each other out and feed off one another.

Frank and Claire Underwood are a team...but Claire is the true backbone.
Frank and Claire Underwood are a team…but Claire is the true backbone.

I am sure people will tell me about all the older shows that incorporated women in power but to me, those older shows didn’t do this with the same gusto. The writing, acting and stories being produced by these various TV shows is stellar work. As far back as I can remember, this is the first time so many TV shows are representing women in a way that is empowering rather than as victims. Heck, look at a show like The Walking Dead! Michonne and Carol are two of the toughest members of the group and they are sounding boards for Rick when he isn’t sure what to do.

Olivia Pope and her gladiators are a great example of strong women and strong men working together.
Olivia Pope and her gladiators are a great example of strong women and strong men working together.

It’s refreshing to see women characters portrayed as strong and beautiful instead of boring or vapid. These women aren’t victims but they are flawed human beings, just like men are. It’s a step towards equality. Maybe that sounds overly hopeful but I firmly believe it’s true. When people are able to see men and women interacting as equals it can only be a positive message that can hopefully inspire the next generations to work together instead of separately.

What do you think? Have you noticed all the Powerful Female Characters on TV lately?

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The Female Perspective: The “Agent Carter” Finale

Welcome! This blog is written by author J.L. Metcalf and will chat about comics, movies, garden gnomes, ghosts or even books and daily life. It is a place where I offer my ladylike perspective on anything and everything my brain can think of. 


I’ve posted a couple times now on the series Agent Carter and it’s no secret that I very much enjoy the show. So you can imagine how excited I was for the finale. I expected big shocks or at least a seriously bad-ass fight between Carter and Dottie but what I got was good but not great. It was a little less than the fantastic episodes we were getting in Agent Carter. Don’t get me wrong, there were some truly amazing moments during the episode. Maybe I’m sad it’s over or maybe it simply wasn’t a perfect episode.

The Agent Carter finale was good, but not great.
The Agent Carter finale was good, but not great.

Even with my disappointment, I disagree with this commenter, Anthony Ocasio on Screenrant, who says that “Marvel failed” with Agent Carter. Is it a failure that Peggy Carter brought a female with stellar fighting skills and a brilliant brain to the forefront of the Marvel Universe? Even for just a little while. I think that all shows have less than stellar episodes sometimes and it’s not a fault of anyone but the writers. The show as a whole is a huge success for comics, Marvel and for women superhero characters.

Ocasio goes on to stay;

Either way, the end result is a product some fans fully support, while others continue to champion its downfall. Ultimately, that means Marvel failed – but there’s always hope that they will return again with a new direction. Agent Carter season 1 isn’t perfect – and it never was going to be, either. It’s also not a triumph for feminism. It’s simply a TV show which failed, and there’s nothing wrong with that.

What the HECK?

Not only is his conclusion condescending, it’s also false. I shouldn’t be overly surprised though, his comments throughout the article are very skewed in one direction. He commends the male characters as being the strongest members of the team and totally ignores the main character, ya know, that Peggy lady. His thoughts are his own and that’s dandy but I find it ignorant and misinformed to say that Marvel failed (but it’s OK, gee whiz guy, I am sure they’re grateful for your approval) and to also state unequivocally that the show failed because some love it and some hate it. I feel as though that is a mark of a show that is well done. It provokes discussion, thought and opinions. To me, that’s a success.

The fact is, the folks at Screenrant clearly don’t care for Agent Carter and they never have. I searched around and found various articles that felt differently about Agent Carter and I was able to get a much fuller picture of the season itself from a critics point of view (I’m always curious what the critics say and often my feelings disagree with their’s).

I love the show and I sure hope it comes back for a second season. Even saying that I can admit that the finale wasn’t all that I hoped for. It felt rushed, it felt uncertain, as if it didn’t quite know where to go and that was not something I had felt in any of the other episodes of Agent Carter. 

Peggy vs. Dottie is an unfinished battle that NEEDS to be finished!
Peggy vs. Dottie is an unfinished battle that NEEDS to be finished!

I refuse to say it was a failure though because ultimately, Agent Carter was a fun romp through another chapter of the Marvel Universe. The attention to detail, with the fun “old-timey” gadgets and amazing fashions were awesome to behold. Not to mention, having a woman of such power as Peggy have to deal with the sexism that ran rampant in that day was a treat to behold. She uses her invisibility to her full advantage during the season. Running around trying to solve the mystery of Howard Starks missing tech without any of her co-workers knowing. She ultimately saves the day by talking Howard Stark down (in the seasons most amazingly written and heartbreaking scene) and then, she gets none of the credit at the end! But this is where Peggy utters one of the best lines of the season;

 “I know my value, everyone else’s opinion really doesn’t matter.”

Oh yes…yes, yes, a million times yes!

Sure, there were parts of the show that didn’t live up to my expectations but there were parts of the episode that made me insanely happy. I was feeling all the feels and to me, that’s a mark of success.

Let’s hope we get to see more of Peggy and the gang in a Season Two!

The great cast helped make "Agent Carter" a great show!
The great cast helped make “Agent Carter” a great show!

What did you think? Did the finale live up to your expectations? Tell me in the comments!

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The Female Perspective: Agent Carter and the Feminist

Welcome! This blog is written by author J.L. Metcalf and will chat about comics, movies, garden gnomes, ghosts or even books and daily life. It is a place where I offer my ladylike perspective on anything and everything my brain can think of. 


As with many of my blog posts, I came across an article today about how we need to stop calling the TV show Agent Carter, feminist. Here’s the thing, feminism gets a bad rap. Because of extremists, people see feminists as angry, man-hating, she-beasts that roar, foam at the mouth and other crazy stuff. That’s only one side of the coin, the other side, it’s us normal feminists who merely want equality between the races. We want hashtags that are #likehumanity instead of #likagirl or #likeaboy because that isn’t equality. That’s division.

It is important that we call Agent Carter a feminist show. It is important that we make a big deal about it.
It is important that we call Agent Carter a feminist show. It is important that we make a big deal about it.

A woman named H. Shaw-Williams wrote the piece. It makes me sad when women put down feminist empowerment. There is no shame in being a feminist! Be proud of it! I had a few issues with her article, keep reading and let me know what you think.

First, Shaw-Williams says:

“As a feminist, I don’t find Agent Carter‘s ‘yay-go-women’ moments (of which there are many) particularly stirring or interesting for the simple reason that they are preaching to the choir.”

Hmmm..OK…I see your point but this is the same type of argument made around gay marriage. The whole, “If it’s not a big deal to me, than it shouldn’t be a big deal” thing is no good. It’ll be awesome when equality of any kind is commonplace, when gay marriage isn’t a big deal. But for right now, these things ARE a big deal and should be treated as such. I can almost guarantee that some guys in the audience aren’t feminists and might actually like those “ya-go-women” moments. Maybe those moments will make them realize that being pro-women is actually a pretty awesome idea.

Feminists get a bad rap. A lot of us are actually really cool, smart people.
Feminists get a bad rap. A lot of us are actually really cool, smart people.

Next…

“Peggy Carter doesn’t get to have personality flaws like Thor’s arrogance or Peter Quill’s dumb brashness, because she’s too busy trying to prove that women are just as good as men.”

Um, what? Have you been watching the show because I see Peggy as a flawed character, yes, she falls back on the superhero “don’t get close to me or you’ll die” idea but hey, it’s a woman saying that for once, cool! Not to mention, we see her sad at the death of a friend (other than Steve Rogers) and we see her be stubborn and pig-headed about things. She’s not perfect. And I don’t feel like she is “too busy trying” to prove her worth. I think she is busy because she is actively proving her worth. You want her to be whiney and angry sometimes, well, let’s give her more time to flex her normal person muscles and see what happens but I personally see her flaws and I respect her more for them. She is a smart, sexy and brave lady and yeah, she IS the first female lead for a Marvel show and that SHOULD be commended. It shouldn’t be ignored at all and we shouldn’t compare her to a teenager in “Dead Like Me”, last I checked, Peggy had been through a WAR and her love had been lost to an icy sea, that matures a person right quick. Peggy is an adult and therefore has the life experience to be more mature about her faults, it doesn’t mean she doesn’t have any.

And Finally…

“The desperate need to have Peggy constantly battling sexist adversity also has the rather ironic side effect of creating an overwhelmingly male cast. “

Check out the time period this show is in my friend. It’s a time when men were predominantly in the work force so of course her interactions are mostly with men. Of course Tony Stark hires a man to work with Peggy. It all makes sense. If you look at other shows like Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D you see a good balance of male and female cast members. The show wouldn’t be realistic if she worked with a whole bunch of women. Personally, I feel like there are plenty of females in the cast, just not in lead positions because Peggy is at work 90% of her time and that means she spends time with men.

Of course the cast is mostly men, look at the time period it exists in!
Of course the cast is mostly men, look at the time period it exists in!

One point Shaw-Williams makes that I do agree with is when she says,

“The problem with setting Agent Carter up as the show which will prove to Marvel that female characters are bankable is the logical extension that, if it fails, it will somehow prove that female characters are not bankable.”

This is a fear of mine but so far, Agent Carter has been a pretty big success for Marvel so for now, we’ll keep hope alive. Not to mention, plans have already been announced for both a Wonder Woman movie and a Captain Marvel movie so I have hope that one day, this won’t even be a big deal.

Upcoming movies like "Wonder Woman" and "Captain Marvel" give us ladies hope that more female-led Marvel movies are on the way.
Upcoming movies like “Wonder Woman” and “Captain Marvel” give us ladies hope that more female-led Marvel movies are on the way.

What do you think? Too much feminine fuss about Agent Carter?Or just the right amount?

Sound off in the comments!

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The Female Perspective: Bionic Boobs and Yes, Women DO Read Comics

Welcome! This blog is written by author J.L. Metcalf and will chat about comics, movies, garden gnomes, ghosts or even books and daily life. It is a place where I offer my ladylike perspective on anything and everything my brain can think of. 


Women working indeed.
Women working indeed.

I’ve read a couple articles recently about taking young girls to comic book stores. The first, written by a Dad who had his mind opened to the fact that ladies in comic books are often dressed scantily and are unappealing to young girls, or, as his daughter asked, “Dad, where are the real comics?” She wanted to know where were the comics that had women on the front who were posed in a stoic fashion, who were dressed as well as their male counterparts, or at least, their boobies were covered. What bugged me more than that (and that bugs me, trust me) was that when the Dad inquired with the worker at the Comic Book store the guy smiled and said, “I bring these home to my daughter.”, Hello Kitty and Monster High.

Seriously? As someone who works at a comic store, that was the best he could come up with? In the comments alone there are hundreds of suggestions for comics for a seven year-old girl.

I realize that comics are neither geared towards seven-year old girls nor are they geared towards girls. The fact is, both of these things need to change. I know that I went into my local comic store awhile back and wanted to get a couple Spiderman comics for my friends son for his birthday, he was very young, maybe three or four. He was fascinated with my comics but stuff like Watchmen and Batman weren’t necessarily good for him to look at so I wanted to try and find him some comics he would like. Lucky for me, the guy in the store was able to steer me towards a couple good ones that were appropriate (meaning, no nudity or terrible violence) but it wasn’t easy, he said most of the books were geared towards older folks, which I do understand but at the same time, it seems kind of sad.

What truly frustrates me about comics today is how they portray women. Not as smart and capable and dressed appropriately but as damsels in distress and wearing outfits that can only be described as ridiculous. A good example is this past summer, Marvel hired artist Milo Manara to do a variant Spiderwoman cover. The first problem here is that Manara is known for drawing erotic art so I think you can guess what the second issue is, see below…

Milo Manara's Spiderwoman variant cover.
Milo Manara’s Spiderwoman variant cover.

Look at the picture above and you tell me that this cover isn’t completely sexist? Have we recently seen Spiderman posing this way? Because if we have, please, set me right and send a picture over to me. I’ll be happy to see it.

In the meantime, I find this type of cover to be extremely insulting. The fact that Marvel knowingly hired Manara, who is known for his erotic art, to do their variant cover astounds me. Is this how they plan on getting in touch with their female readers? Because, I gotta say, I would never pick up a comic book with this as the cover. Simply looking at it fills me with anger. And while I realize that we live in a culture where “sex sells”, it seems like overkill to me.

When is the comic book world going to get on board with the fact that women do read comics and that it’s disgusting to put this type of ridiculousness on the cover? No wonder the Dad’s little girl was confused, sex doesn’t sell to young kids, only adults. These types of covers are part of the problem, they are clearly trying to draw in an audience of adolescent men to read their books. Fine. I understand that, but what the industry is failing to understand is that it’s not just adolescent men reading the comics anymore, women are reading them. According to recent market research, about 46.6% of comic readers are female.

“If you go to conventions and comic book stores, more and more female readers are emerging. They are starved for content and looking for content they can relate to.

– Axel Alonso, Marvel’s editor-in-chief”

So here’s the issue, why do comic artists feel the need to sexualize the women but not the men? I realize that everyone is wearing skin tight costumes that show off muscles and bulges and whatnot but even with that, the men still manage to look brave and tough while the women are left pushing their breasts or their butts out (sometimes both at the same time which just looks painful) and it’s ridiculous. What’s truly ridiculous is that there are still men out there who don’t think women read or enjoy comics. After a recent announcement of the relaunch of the Ms. Marvel comic (Ms. Marvel now being a Muslim Teen) this was stated by a reader online:

“Yeah, this won’t last very long. Women don’t buy comics. They love geek culture, and they love all the attention it gets them but they don’t read comics in any signifigant numbers. Once they start seeing that they aren’t making money by ignoring their core audence, they’ll go back to business as usual.” ~ From the I Like Comics Too Blog

As a strong-willed feminist I cannot see why there isn’t equality in comics. Women kick butt just as well as men do (Look at Wonder Woman, Black Widow, Supergirl and our ever-lovely Agent Carter) so why do comics have to make such an effort to make sure we know they are women? Or is it that the men drawing these women honestly have no idea what they’re doing? I have to doubt that as most of them are very smart men with extraordinary talents. They can draw a woman who is both sexy and powerful without making her look like she’s selling herself on the street corner.

The new Ms. Marvel. Look how many clothes she has on!
The new Ms. Marvel. Look how many clothes she has on!

I want comic covers like the Spiderwoman variant to be part of a bygone era. I want covers to be wonderful works of art that depict men and women on equal footing when they are fighting the battles. I want women to be strong, stronger than the men sometimes, so that they can be seen as more than sex objects to the young readers. The fact is, comic book companies are starting to see the change, they are starting to see that women want women characters in their comics. Which is great! My hope is that they’ll see this changing trend and also manage to draw the women respectfully and without Bionic Boobs of Death. Most of all, I want the guys drawing these ladies to understand that by drawing women as tarts, you are doing a disservice to the comics industry. Women read comics too and most women won’t pick up a comic with a half naked woman posing in an anatomically impossible fashion to show off her T&A. Comic books and their artists need to get with the times. Start showing women as both sexy and tough and you’ll enhance your readership. Of that, I have no doubt.

What do you think? Let me know in the comments!